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Tuesday, August 4, 2009

"Spotlight" by Abena {Your thoughts on this video}

7 comments:

Kicukalah said...

This is still such an interesting topic to me. I mean to see black women and even white women with their bi-racial children not embrace their own hair. To me it's not about wearing the weave or even having the hair relaxed. It's about HATING the highly textured hair. What so sad is the ones that hate it the most are the very ones that grow it out of their own scalp.
I had my first perm (relaxer) when I was still in pre-school. I never knew what my hair really looked liked until now. Some 20+ years later. And you know what, I love it!

NappTown said...

I rebelled against how I was raised. My mom used to press my hair and then it was the perms. My mom has always worn wigs or weaves. My hair grows fast and long. When I cut the perm out of my hair my family thought there was something mentally wrong with me. My sister told me once that she hated her hair. She said that she wanted the european type hair. Still to this day she says certain things that let's me know that she really does not like my hair the way it is now. It is so sad to see the way women have been brain washed. BTW, I love my hair too! :-)

Kristin Jag said...

Thanks for posting the Tyra show. I hadn't seen it and I thought it was very interesting to see the different perspectives. It also explains why, as a caucasion mom with a black daughter, I get so many people offering different unsolicited advice on her hair. The different generations are really not on the same page, it seems, so the advice on hairstyle and products is always different. I truly love my daugthers hair, and it is honestly much more time consuming than my other bio daugthers, but I continue to learn more about hair care and switch between braids and wearing her hair natural(my favorite way).

Kwasmrs said...

It's interesting because I have a neice who is biracial and she makes the same complaints as the biracial girl in the video. It is really sad because I also know that her mom does not know how to do her hair but is unwilling to learn. Now most of her hair is broken off due to overprocessing and now she is dealing with the loss of her hair, not just the kinks.

Shelly said...

Wow... I don't know what to say. It's one thing to want to have more versatility or being a person who LOVES to change her hairstyles and play around with textures; but is a whole different story when the root of the chemical processing is a deeply rooted dysfunctional abhorrence to what GOD created in you. Wow! And, to teach it to your girls? Wow... wow. When are we going to stop hating ourselves and begin to accept our divine appointment and creation by The Almighty?

champagnevelvet said...

more than sad. nothing has changed with this younger generation of mothers. as a matter of fact, i am beginning to believe the previous generation knew better, given that the mothers from that generation had some knowledge that the chemicals used to relax our hair was not good. they would not allow us to relax our hair until we were 18 yrs of age...when we began to make our own life changing decision. the next generations of african american kids will be just as confused about their natural god-given hair as black women have been in the past and will continue to hate themselves.
i did not love my hair until i took the step to go natural and i suspect there are a few other on this blog who know exactly how that feels...beautiful and extremely liberating.

Zyhone said...

It is said to see these babies starting off with a poor image of themselves, because of thier hair textures. I think afro puffs and other styles are the cutest on children. The mother's are to blame for how the children feel. If you have no confidence, none can be passed down. What would be even more interesting is to see Caucasian children do the same exercise with thier hair. We assume that everything is fine with the way they feel about thier hair. That is why they perm, cut, color, and were the masters at wearing weaves to deal with thin lifeless hair before we started.